Evolved to satisfy our immediate needs: Self-control and the rewarding properties of food

@article{Bos2006EvolvedTS,
  title={Evolved to satisfy our immediate needs: Self-control and the rewarding properties of food},
  author={Ruud van den Bos and D. T. D. de Ridder},
  journal={Appetite},
  year={2006},
  volume={47},
  pages={24-29}
}
Evolutionary explanations of overeating in modern society emphasize that humans have evolved to eat to their physiological limits when food is available. The present paper challenges the idea that eating is driven by the availability of food only and proposes that it is regulated by strategic anticipatory behaviour in service of the most profitable long-term scenario as well. Our alternative explanation emphasizes the interaction between the reward system that regulates the liking and wanting… 
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