Evolutionary traps as keys to understanding behavioral maladapation

@article{Robertson2016EvolutionaryTA,
  title={Evolutionary traps as keys to understanding behavioral maladapation},
  author={Bruce A. Robertson and Anna D. Chalfoun},
  journal={Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences},
  year={2016},
  volume={12},
  pages={12-17}
}
Evolutionary traps are severe cases of behavioral maladaptation that occur when, due to human activity, the cues animals use to guide their behavior become uncoupled from their fitness consequences. The result is that animals can prefer the most dangerous resources or behaviors, even when better options are available. Traps are increasingly common and represent a significant wildlife conservation problem. Understanding of the more proximate sensory-cognitive mechanisms underpinning traps… 
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