Evolutionary relationships of bacterial and archaeal glutamine synthetase genes

@article{Brown2004EvolutionaryRO,
  title={Evolutionary relationships of bacterial and archaeal glutamine synthetase genes},
  author={J. Brown and Y. Masuchi and F. Robb and W. F. Doolittlel},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={38},
  pages={566-576}
}
  • J. Brown, Y. Masuchi, +1 author W. F. Doolittlel
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Molecular Evolution
  • Glutamine synthetase (GS), an essential enzyme in ammonia assimilation and glutamine biosynthesis, has three distinctive types: GSI, GSII and GSIII. Genes for GSI have been found only in bacteria (eubacteria) and archaea (archaebacteria), while GSII genes only occur in eukaryotes and a few soil-dwelling bacteria. GSIII genes have been found in only a few bacterial species. Recently, it has been suggested that several lateral gene transfers of archaeal GSI genes to bacteria may have occurred. In… CONTINUE READING
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