Evolutionary relationships among photosynthetic prokaryotes (Heliobacterium chlorum, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, cyanobacteria, Chlorobium tepidum and proteobacteria): implications regarding the origin of photosynthesis

@article{Gupta1999EvolutionaryRA,
  title={Evolutionary relationships among photosynthetic prokaryotes (Heliobacterium chlorum, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, cyanobacteria, Chlorobium tepidum and proteobacteria): implications regarding the origin of photosynthesis},
  author={Radhey S. Gupta and Tariq Mukhtar and Bhag Singh},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={1999},
  volume={32}
}
The presence of shared conserved insertions or deletions in proteins (referred to as signature sequences) provides a powerful means to deduce the evolutionary relationships among prokaryotic organisms. This approach was used in the present work to deduce the branching orders of various eubacterial taxa consisting of photosynthetic organisms. For this purpose, portions of the Hsp60 and Hsp70 genes, covering known signature sequence regions, were PCR‐amplified and sequenced from Heliobacterium… 
The phylogeny of proteobacteria: relationships to other eubacterial phyla and eukaryotes.
  • R. Gupta
  • Biology
    FEMS microbiology reviews
  • 2000
TLDR
An unexpected but important aspect of the relationship deduced here is that the main eubacterial phyla are related to each other linearly rather than in a tree-like manner, suggesting that the major evolutionary changes within Bacteria have taken place in a directional manner.
The branching order and phylogenetic placement of species from completed bacterial genomes, based on conserved indels found in various proteins
  • Radhey S. Gupta
  • Biology
    International microbiology : the official journal of the Spanish Society for Microbiology
  • 2001
TLDR
The results strongly vindicate the usefulness of the signature sequence approach to understanding phylogeny within the Bacteria and show that it provides a reliable and internally consistent means for the placement of bacterial species into different groups and for determining the relative branching order of the groups.
Phylogenetic framework and molecular signatures for the class Chloroflexi and its different clades; proposal for division of the class Chloroflexi class. nov. into the suborder Chloroflexineae subord. nov., consisting of the emended family Oscillochloridaceae and the family Chloroflexaceae fam. nov.
TLDR
It is suggested that the phylum Chloroflexi “sensu stricto” should be comprised only of the classes Chlor oflexi and Thermomicrobia and the other four classes (viz. Dehalococcoidetes, Anaerolineae, Caldilineae and Ktedonobacteria), which is supported by both phylogenetic means and the identified CSIs.
Occurrence of Hydrogenases in Cyanobacteria and Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria: Implications for the Phylogenetic Origin of Cyanobacterial and Algal Hydrogenases
TLDR
This work analyzed the occurrence of hydrogenases in cyanobacteria and deduced a FeFe-hydrogenase in three different heliobacterial strains and found the green nonsulfur bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was found to be the closest ancestor.
Evolutionary relationships among photosynthetic bacteria
TLDR
All main groups within bacteria can now be defined in clear molecular terms and their relative branching orders logically deduced using the indel model.
Protein signatures (molecular synapomorphies) that are distinctive characteristics of the major cyanobacterial clades.
  • Radhey S. Gupta
  • Biology
    International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology
  • 2009
TLDR
The unique presence of these molecular signatures in all available sequences from the indicated groups of cyanobacteria, but not in any other cyanob bacteria, indicates that these synapomorphies provide novel and potentially useful means for circumscription of several important taxonomic clades of cyanOBacteria in more definitive terms.
Phylogeny and molecular signatures (conserved proteins and indels) that are specific for the Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi species
TLDR
The molecular signatures described here provide novel tools for identifying and circumscribing species from the Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi phyla as well as some of their main groups in clear terms and provide strong evidence that species from these two phyla are specifically related to each other and they form a single superphylum.
The Phylogeny and Signature Sequences Characteristics of Fibrobacteres, Chlorobi, and Bacteroidetes
TLDR
Signatures in a number of other proteins provide evidence that the FCB group of bacteria diverged at a similar time as the Chlamydiae group, and that the Spirochetes and Aquificales groups are its closest relatives.
Molecular evidence for the early evolution of photosynthesis.
TLDR
Phylogenetic analyses of multiple magnesium-tetrapyrrole biosynthesis genes using a combination of distance, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood methods indicate that heliobacteria are closest to the last common ancestor of all oxygenic photosynthetic lineages and that green sulfur bacteria and green nonsulfur bacteria are each other's closest relatives.
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