Evolutionary relationships among bullhead sharks (Chondrichthyes, Heterodontiformes)

@article{Slater2020EvolutionaryRA,
  title={Evolutionary relationships among bullhead sharks (Chondrichthyes, Heterodontiformes)},
  author={Tiffany S. Slater and Kate Ashbrook and J{\"u}rgen Kriwet},
  journal={Papers in Palaeontology},
  year={2020},
  volume={6}
}
The evolution of modern sharks, skates and rays (Elasmobranchii) is largely enigmatic due to their possession of a labile cartilaginous skeleton; consequently, taxonomic assignment often depends on isolated teeth. Bullhead sharks (Heterodontiformes) are a group of basal neoselachians, thus their remains and relationships are integral to understanding elasmobranch evolution. Herein we fully describe †Paracestracion danieli – a bullhead shark from the Late Jurassic plattenkalks of Eichstätt… 
1 Citations
Comment on the letter of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology (SVP) dated April 21, 2020 regarding “Fossils from conflict zones and reproducibility of fossil-based scientific data”: the importance of private collections
Carolin Haug1,2 · Jelle W. F. Reumer3,4,5 · Joachim T. Haug1,2 · Antonio Arillo6 · Denis Audo7,8 · Dany Azar9 · Viktor Baranov1 · Rolf Beutel10 · Sylvain Charbonnier11 · Rodney Feldmann12 · Christian

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