Evolutionary relationship of archaebacteria, eubacteria, and eukaryotes inferred from phylogenetic trees of duplicated genes.

@article{Iwabe1989EvolutionaryRO,
  title={Evolutionary relationship of archaebacteria, eubacteria, and eukaryotes inferred from phylogenetic trees of duplicated genes.},
  author={Naoyuki Iwabe and Kei-ichi Kuma and Masami Hasegawa and S. Osawa and Takashi Miyata},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1989},
  volume={86 23},
  pages={
          9355-9
        }
}
  • N. Iwabe, K. Kuma, +2 authors T. Miyata
  • Published 1989
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
All extant organisms are though to be classified into three primary kingdoms, eubacteria, eukaryotes, and archaebacteria. [...] Key Method To overcome this difficulty, we compared a pair of duplicated genes, elongation factors Tu and G, and the alpha and beta subunits of ATPase, which are thought to have diverged by gene duplication before divergence of the primary kingdoms.Expand
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Comprehensive analysis of the origin of eukaryotic genomes.
TLDR
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The phylogeny of proteobacteria: relationships to other eubacterial phyla and eukaryotes.
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By 16S rRNA sequence measure the archaebacteria constitute a phylogenetically coherent grouping (clade), which excludes both the eubacteria and the eukaryotes--a conclusion that is supported by other sequence evidence as well. Expand
The Origin of Eukaryote and Archaebacterial Cells
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It is argued that the most primitive eukaryote was a phagotrophic archezoan, with no chloroplasts, no mitochondria, no microbodies, and no stacked smooth cisternae forming a Golgi dictyosome, but possessing a single cilium with a sheaf of rootlet microtubules surrounding the single nucleus that divided by a closed mitosis. Expand
Phylogenetic analysis based on rRNA sequences supports the archaebacterial rather than the eocyte tree
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It is reported that analysis of small subunit data by the neighbour-joining and maximum parasimony methods favours the archaebacterial tree and that computer simulations using either the arch aebacterial or the eocyte tree as a model tree show that the probability of recovering the model tree is very high for both the neighbour and maximum parsimony methods but is relatively low for the evolutionary parsimony method. Expand
Origin of the eukaryotic nucleus determined by rate-invariant analysis of rRNA sequences
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Using evolutionary parsimony, a newly developed rate-invariant treeing algorithm, the eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA genes are shown to have evolved from the eocytes, a group of extremely thermophilic, sulphur-metabolizing, anucleate cells that probably lacked nuclei, metabolized sulphur and lived at near-boiling temperatures. Expand
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A phylogenetic tree of most of the major groups of organisms has been constructed from the 352 5S ribosomal RNA sequences now available. The tree suggests that there are several major groups ofExpand
Eocytes: a new ribosome structure indicates a kingdom with a close relationship to eukaryotes.
TLDR
It is suggested that an appropriate kingdom name for this group of ribosomes from eubacteria, archaebacteria, eukaryotes, and a group of sulfur-dependent bacteria would be the Eocyta. Expand
Reintedness of archaebacterial RNA polymerase core subunits to their eubacterial and eultaryotic equivalents
The sequence of the genes encoding the four largest subunits of the RNA polymerase of the archaebacterium Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was determined and putative translation signals wereExpand
Archaebacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerases testify to the evolution of the eukaryotic nuclear genome.
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Unrooted phylogenetic dendrograms derived from both distance matrix and parsimony analyses show the archaebacteria are a coherent group closely related to the eukaryotic nuclear RNA polymerase II and/or III lineages. Expand
The membrane-associated ATPase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is distantly related to F1-ATPase as assessed from the primary structure of its alpha-subunit.
TLDR
The S. acidocaldarius ATPase and probably other archaebacterial ATPases also appear to belong to a new group of ion-translocating ATPases that has only a distant relationship to F1-ATPase. Expand
Molecular cloning of the beta-subunit of a possible non-F0F1 type ATP synthase from the acidothermophilic archaebacterium, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.
TLDR
The distant homology of the S. acidocaldarius ATPase alpha and beta subunits when compared to those of F0F1-ATPases indicates that this archaebacterial ATPase belongs to an ion-translocating ATPase family uniquely different than F0f1- ATPases even if S. Acidocaldarian ATPase and F 0F 1-ATpases have been derived from a common ancestral ATPase. Expand
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