Evolutionary origins of the avian brain

@article{Balanoff2013EvolutionaryOO,
  title={Evolutionary origins of the avian brain},
  author={Amy M. Balanoff and Gabe S. Bever and Timothy Rowe and Mark A. Norell},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2013},
  volume={501},
  pages={93-96}
}
Features that were once considered exclusive to modern birds, such as feathers and a furcula, are now known to have first appeared in non-avian dinosaurs. However, relatively little is known of the early evolutionary history of the hyperinflated brain that distinguishes birds from other living reptiles and provides the important neurological capablities required by flight. Here we use high-resolution computed tomography to estimate and compare cranial volumes of extant birds, the early avialan… Expand
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