Evolutionary origins of the SARS-CoV-2 sarbecovirus lineage responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic

@article{Boni2020EvolutionaryOO,
  title={Evolutionary origins of the SARS-CoV-2 sarbecovirus lineage responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic},
  author={Maciej F. Boni and Philippe Lemey and Xiaowei Jiang and Tommy Tsan-Yuk Lam and Blair W. Perry and Todd A. Castoe and Andrew Rambaut and David L. Robertson},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2020}
}
There are outstanding evolutionary questions on the recent emergence of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2/hCoV-19 in Hubei province that caused the COVID-19 pandemic, including (1) the relationship of the new virus to the SARS-related coronaviruses, (2) the role of bats as a reservoir species, (3) the potential role of other mammals in the emergence event, and (4) the role of recombination in viral emergence. Here, we address these questions and find that the sarbecoviruses – the viral subgenus… 

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