Evolutionary implications of early male and satellite nest production in Polistes exclamans colony cycles

@article{Strassmann2004EvolutionaryIO,
  title={Evolutionary implications of early male and satellite nest production in Polistes exclamans colony cycles},
  author={Joan E. Strassmann},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={8},
  pages={55-64}
}
  • J. Strassmann
  • Published 1 February 1981
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Summary1.Polistes exclamans populations in central Texas have a unique colony cycle. Of all P. exclamans nests 20%–38% produce males with the first brood of workers. Nests producing early males have significantly more females, cells, pupae, and emergences at the time of early male production than nests not producing early males.2.Early male production may have originated as an adaptation caused by the large number of queens that die before autumn reproductive males and females are produced. It… 

Figures from this paper

Dispersal decisions and predispersal behavior in Polistes paper wasp ‘workers’
  • E. Tibbetts
  • Environmental Science
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2007
TLDR
It is found that P. dominulus females with short nest tenure behave much like gynes (reproductive-destined offspring produced at the end of the season), as wasps with long nest tenure are behaviorally selfish while on the natal colony.
Reproductivity of early males of the temperate paper wasp Polistes rothneyi iwatai
TLDR
Results suggest that although most early males of P. rothneyi iwatai do not produce offspring, their mating may be linked to the occasional production of triploid females.
Diploid males and sex determination in a paper wasp, Polistes chinensis antennalis (Hymenoptera, Vespidae)
Summary: Beyond helping the queen's reproductive function, the worker caste of Polistes wasps is expected to have an alternative reproductive strategy; to become a replacement queen, following
Relatedness of Workers to Brood in the Social Wasp, Polistes exclamans (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)
TLDR
Differences in the probability that a female can successfully nest alone between early spring and mid summer may be the reason workers usually rear distant relatives on the nest they emerged from rather than beginning their own nest where they could rear progeny.
Orphaning does not affect the colony productivity of the primitive eusocial wasp Polistes snelleni
TLDR
The results suggest that the reproductive potential of the successive queens in the orphans is not lower than that of the foundress queens, and that the productivity of the orphan colonies is maintained rather than causing potential conflict over direct reproduction among workers.
An alternative strategy for maintenance of eusociality after nest destruction: new nest construction in a primitively eusocial wasp
TLDR
The results suggest that the presence of the queen is important for maintaining eussociality in primitively eusocial wasps after nest destruction.
Reconstruction ofRopalidia fasciata nests by progeny females after a typhoon and its significance in the social evolution of wasps
  • Yosiaki Itǒ
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Ecological Research
  • 2006
TLDR
A strong typhoon, Typhoon 13, which swept through Okinawa on 2 and 3 September 1993, knocked down 57 to 61 of 97Ropalidia fasciata nests, and a large number of nests were established in the spring of 1994, and females emerging from reconstructed nests in 1993 probably become foundresses in 1994.
Genetic relatedness and colony organization in a species complex of ponerine ants
  • P. S. Ward
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
Comparisons within the genus Rhytidoponera indicate selective factors favoring worker-reproductive colonies over queenright colonies in xeric environments and in patchy mesic habitats, and evidence that worker altruism and ergonomic efficiency are better developed in Type A colonies.
Diploid males and their triploid offspring in the paper wasp Polistes dominulus
TLDR
Evidence that both diploid males and triploid females remain undetected throughout the colony cycle is presented, which is particularly relevant for introduced populations with few alleles at the sex-determining locus but cannot be ignored in native populations without supporting genetic data.
Worker reproduction and related behavior in orphan colonies of a Japanese paper wasp,Polistes jadwigae (Hymenoptera, Vespidae)
TLDR
Investment sex ratio of queenright (=normal) colonies (0.27) fell between the 2 theoretical values, corresponding to worker control and queen control, both being calculated by considering the excess of males produced in the orphan colonies.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 34 REFERENCES
Behavioral ecology of the social wasp, Mischocyttarus mexicanus
  • Marcia Litte
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
The social biology of the polistine wasp Mischocyttarus mexicanus was studied in southern Florida at the Archbold Biological Station and there were parallel hierarchies of dominance, defined in terms of degree of aggression, ovarian development, and foraging frequency.
Parasitoids, Predators, and Group Size in the Paper Wasp, Polistes Exclamans
The paper wasp Polistes exclamans loses part of its brood to the parasitoids Chalcoela iphitalis (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae) and Elasmus polistis (Hymenoptera:Chalcidoidea:Eulophidae) and loses entire
Social biology of the polistine wasp Mischocyttarus labiatus : survival in a Colombian rain forest
TLDR
The Neotropical polistine wasp Mischocyttarus labiatus was studied in montane rain forest at Anchicaya, Colombia and the social behavior of the species and some environmental factors that affect it were investigated.
Philopatric and nonphilopatric foundress associations in the social wasp Polistes fuscatus
  • J. Klahn
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
Summary1.Overwintering females of the paper wasp, Polistes fuscatus, were marked on their home colonies in 1977 and identified in the spring of 1978. Most females which joined foundress associations
THE SELECTIVE ADVANTAGE OF FOUNDRESS ASSOCIATIONS IN POLISTES FUSCATUS (HYMENOPTERA: VESPIDAE): A FIELD STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF PREDATION ON PRODUCTIVITY
Colonies of P . fuscatus that were initiated by various numbers of foundresses were studied to gather basic life table information. This information was used to estimate the selective advantage of
Construction and utilization of multiple combs in Polistes canadensis in relation to the biology of a predaceous moth
  • R. Jeanne
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
It is hypothesized that several peculiar behaviors exhibited by the wasp, including multiple comb building, are adaptations that reduce brood loss to these moths, which could help counter the much greater risk to the second batch of brood of loss to moth infestation.
Relative inclusive fitness in the social wasp Polistes metricus
TLDR
The β foundresses who may have the option of founding their own nests would not appear to decrease their inclusive fitness by becoming a subordinated foundress on the nest of a foundress from their own nest even though they give up a substantial portion of reproduction and increase their chance of death.
The Swarming of Polistes Wasps in Temperate Regions
It is a well known fact that social wasps in the tropics resort to swarming behavior when founding new colonies. The colonies of these wasps are perennial; nest building and the production of young
The Nests and the Adults of Colonies of Polistes Wasps
  • P. Rau
  • Environmental Science
  • 1946
TLDR
The variation in the size of the nests of each species of Polistes wasps may be attributed to several factors, including the temperament of the foundresses, who may be brilliant or stupid, lazy or industrious.
Honey Caches Help Female Paper Wasps (Polistes annularis) Survive Texas Winters
Polistes annularis females store honey in their nests in autumn. They return to their nests on warmn winter days, eat honey, and defend itfrom non-sisters. Honey deprivation decreases numbers
...
1
2
3
4
...