Evolutionary biology: Essence of mitochondria

@article{Henze2003EvolutionaryBE,
  title={Evolutionary biology: Essence of mitochondria},
  author={K. Henze and W. Martin},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={426},
  pages={127-128}
}
For years, a unicellular creature called Giardia has occupied a special place in biology because it was thought to lack mitochondria. But it does have them — though tiny, they pack a surprising anaerobic punch. 
Giardia: Not so special, after all?
The parasite Giardia was thought to represent a throwback to the earliest days of advanced cellular life. But biologists are now arguing over its true status. Jonathan Knight reports.
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The acquisitions of mitochondria and plastids were important events in the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, supplying it with compartmentalized bioenergetic and biosynthetic factories and transforming into extraordinarily diverse organelles that reveal complex histories that the authors are only beginning to decipher. Expand
Hydrogenosomes and Mitosomes: Conservation and Evolution of Functions
TLDR
The field studying unusual mitochondria in microbial eukaryotes has come full circle, and the discovery of mitochondrial compartments in all supposedly amitochondriate protists studied so far indicates that all eUKaryotes do have mitochondria indeed. Expand
Mitochondria of protists.
TLDR
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  • 2005
TLDR
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Hydrogenosomes and symbiosis.
TLDR
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Energetics and genetics across the prokaryote-eukaryote divide
  • N. Lane
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Biology Direct
  • 2011
TLDR
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  • T. Lithgow, A. Schneider
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2010
TLDR
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The Organellar Genome and Metabolic Potential of the Hydrogen-Producing Mitochondrion of Nyctotherus ovalis
TLDR
The almost complete genome of the hydrogen-producing mitochondrion of the anaerobic ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis is presented and it is shown that, except for the notable absence of genes encoding electron transport chain components of Complexes III, IV, and V, it has a gene content similar to the mitochondrial genomes of aerobic ciliates. Expand
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