Evolutionary and ecological implications of cardenolide sequestration in the monarch butterfly

@article{Malcolm2005EvolutionaryAE,
  title={Evolutionary and ecological implications of cardenolide sequestration in the monarch butterfly},
  author={S. Malcolm and L. Brower},
  journal={Experientia},
  year={2005},
  volume={45},
  pages={284-295}
}
  • S. Malcolm, L. Brower
  • Published 2005
  • Biology
  • Experientia
  • Monarch butterflies sequester cardenolides from their larval host plants in the milkweed genusAsclepias for use in defense against predation. Of 108Asclepias species in North America, monarchs are known to feed as larvae on 27. Research on 11 of these has shown that monarchs sequester cardenolides most effectively, to an asymptote of approximately 350 μg/0.1 g dry butterfly, from plants with intermediate cardenolide contents rather than from those with very high or very low cardenolide contents… CONTINUE READING
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