Evolutionary and developmental origins of the vertebrate dentition

@article{Huysseune2009EvolutionaryAD,
  title={Evolutionary and developmental origins of the vertebrate dentition},
  author={Ann Huysseune and Jean-Yves Sire and Paul Eckhard Witten},
  journal={Journal of Anatomy},
  year={2009},
  volume={214}
}
According to the classical theory, teeth derive from odontodes that invaded the oral cavity in conjunction with the origin of jaws (the ‘outside in’ theory). A recent alternative hypothesis suggests that teeth evolved prior to the origin of jaws as endodermal derivatives (the ‘inside out’ hypothesis). We compare the two theories in the light of current data and propose a third scenario, a revised ‘outside in’ hypothesis. We suggest that teeth may have arisen before the origin of jaws, as a… Expand
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