Evolutionary adaptations to dietary changes.

@article{Luca2010EvolutionaryAT,
  title={Evolutionary adaptations to dietary changes.},
  author={Francesca Luca and George H. Perry and Anna Di Rienzo},
  journal={Annual review of nutrition},
  year={2010},
  volume={30},
  pages={
          291-314
        }
}
Through cultural innovation and changes in habitat and ecology, there have been a number of major dietary shifts in human evolution, including meat eating, cooking, and those associated with plant and animal domestication. The identification of signatures of adaptations to such dietary changes in the genome of extant primates (including humans) may shed light not only on the evolutionary history of our species, but also on the mechanisms that underlie common metabolic diseases in modern human… Expand
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