Evolutionary Transformation of the Palmaris Longus Muscle in Flying Squirrels (Pteromyini: Sciuridae): An Anatomical Consideration of the Origin of the Uniquely Specialized Styliform Cartilage

@article{Kawashima2017EvolutionaryTO,
  title={Evolutionary Transformation of the Palmaris Longus Muscle in Flying Squirrels (Pteromyini: Sciuridae): An Anatomical Consideration of the Origin of the Uniquely Specialized Styliform Cartilage},
  author={Tomokazu Kawashima and Richard W. Thorington and Paula W Bohaska and Fumi Sato},
  journal={The Anatomical Record},
  year={2017},
  volume={300}
}
A long‐standing issue in squirrel evolution and development is the origin of the styliform cartilage of flying squirrels, which extends laterally from the carpus to support the gliding membrane (patagium). Because the styliform cartilage is one of the uniquely specialized structures permitting gliding locomotion, the knowledge of its origin and surrounding transformation is key for understanding their aerodynamic evolution. The developmental study that would definitely answer this question… 
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