Evolutionary Perspectives on Hermaphroditism in Fishes

@article{Avise2009EvolutionaryPO,
  title={Evolutionary Perspectives on Hermaphroditism in Fishes},
  author={J. Avise and J. Mank},
  journal={Sexual Development},
  year={2009},
  volume={3},
  pages={152 - 163}
}
  • J. Avise, J. Mank
  • Published 2009
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Sexual Development
  • Hermaphroditism is a derived and polyphyletic condition in fishes, documented in about 2% of all extant teleost species scattered across more than 20 taxonomic families in 9 orders. It shows a variety of expressions that can be categorized into sequential and synchronous modes. Among the sequential hermaphrodites are protogynous species in which an individual begins reproductive life as a female and later may switch to male, protandrous species in which a fish starts as a male and later may… CONTINUE READING

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