Evolution patterns of open-source software systems and communities

@inproceedings{Nakakoji2002EvolutionPO,
  title={Evolution patterns of open-source software systems and communities},
  author={Kumiyo Nakakoji and Yasuhiro Yamamoto and Yoshiyuki Nishinaka and Kouichi Kishida and Yunwen Ye},
  booktitle={IWPSE '02},
  year={2002}
}
Open-Source Software (OSS) development is regarded as a successful model of encouraging "natural product evolution". To understand how this "natural product evolution" happens, we have conducted a case study of four typical OSS projects. Unlike most previous studies on software evolution that focus on the evolution of the system per se, our study takes a broader perspective: It examines not only the evolution of OSS systems, but also the evolution of the associated OSS communities, as well as… 

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