Evolution of viviparous reproduction in Paleozoic and Mesozoic reptiles.

@article{Blackburn2014EvolutionOV,
  title={Evolution of viviparous reproduction in Paleozoic and Mesozoic reptiles.},
  author={Daniel G. Blackburn and Christian A. Sidor},
  journal={The International journal of developmental biology},
  year={2014},
  volume={58 10-12},
  pages={
          935-48
        }
}
Although viviparity (live-bearing reproduction) is widely distributed among lizards and snakes, it is entirely absent from other extant Reptilia and many extinct forms. However, paleontological evidence reveals that viviparity was present in at least nine nominal groups of pre-Cenozoic reptiles, representing a minimum of six separate evolutionary origins of this reproductive mode. Two viviparous clades (sauropterygians and ichthyopterygians) lasted more than 155 million years, a figure that… 

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