Evolution of trophic transmission in parasites: the need to reach a mating place?

@article{Brown2001EvolutionOT,
  title={Evolution of trophic transmission in parasites: the need to reach a mating place?},
  author={Sam P. Brown and François Renaud and Jean-François Gu{\'e}gan and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Thomas},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2001},
  volume={14}
}
Although numerous parasite species have a simple life cycle (SLC) and complete their life cycle in one host, there are other parasite species that exploit several host species successively. From an evolutionary perspective, understanding the mix of adaptive and contingent forces shaping the transition from an ancestral single‐host state to such a complex life cycle (CLC) has proved an intriguing challenge. In this paper, we propose a new hypothesis, which states that CLCs involving trophic… 
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INFORMATION ABOUT TRANSMISSION OPPORTUNITIES TRIGGERS A LIFE‐HISTORY SWITCH IN A PARASITE
  • R. Poulin
  • Biology, Medicine
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2003
TLDR
It is demonstrated experimentally that a trematode parasite, Coitocaecum parvum, can accelerate its development and rapidly reach precocious maturity in its crustacean intermediate host in the absence of chemical cues emanating from its fish definitive host.
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