Evolution of the mammalian G protein α subunit multigene family

@article{Wilkie1992EvolutionOT,
  title={Evolution of the mammalian G protein $\alpha$ subunit multigene family},
  author={Thomas M. Wilkie and Debra J. Gilbert and Anne S. Olsen and Xiao-Ning Chen and Thomas T. Amatruda and Julie R. Korenberg and Barbara J. Trask and Pieter J. de Jong and Randall R. Reed and Melvin I. Simon and Nancy A. Jenkins and Neal G. Copeland},
  journal={Nature Genetics},
  year={1992},
  volume={1},
  pages={85-91}
}
Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) transduce extracellular signals received by transmembrane receptors to effector proteins. The multigene family of G protein α subunits, which interact with receptors and effectors, exhibit a high level of sequence diversity. In mammals, 15 Gα subunit genes can be grouped by sequence and functional similarities into four classes. We have determined the murine chromosomal locations of all 15 Gα subunit genes using an interspecific… 
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The focus here is on mutations in he genes for G protein subunits that result in disease and he molecular basis for their deleterious effect on cells and the implications of the increase in diversity and ize of the Gprotein subunit gene subfamilies with cellular omplexity.
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MINIREVIEW The G Protein Subunit Gene Families
TLDR
The recently completed characterization of the genomes of the G proteinsubunits and b and g subunits indicates that these gene families are related to large-scale human and mouse genome sequencing efforts.
Tracing the evolution of the heterotrimeric G protein α subunit in Metazoa
TLDR
The presence and absence of every Gα gene (GNA-) across all major branches of Deuterostomia and the conservation of the underlying exon-intron structures across these phylogenetic groups are evaluated.
Design of degenerate oligonucleotide primers for cloning of G-protein alpha subunits.
Publisher Summary Heterotrimeric G proteins couple the seven-transmembrane domain receptors to various intracellular effectors, such as adenylyl cyclase, phospholipase C- β , and ion channels.
Receptors and G proteins as primary components of transmembrane signal transduction
TLDR
Seven-transmembrane receptors signal through nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) into the cell, carrying an endogenous GTPase activity allowing reversible functional coupling between ligand-bound receptors and effectors such as enzymes and ion channels.
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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The G protein family of signal transducers includes five heterotrimers, which are most clearly distinguished by their different alpha chains. The family includes Gs and Gi, the stimulatory and
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TLDR
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