Evolution of the human pelvis and obstructed labor: New explanations of an old obstetrical dilemma.

@article{Pavlicev2019EvolutionOT,
  title={Evolution of the human pelvis and obstructed labor: New explanations of an old obstetrical dilemma.},
  author={Mihaela Pavlicev and Roberto J. Romero and Philipp Mitteroecker},
  journal={American journal of obstetrics and gynecology},
  year={2019}
}
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It is proposed that pelvic dimensions have evolved different "compromise solutions" in different populations in response to local selective regimes, and results from a reanalysis of a large published global dataset on human pelvic canal dimensions clearly support this view.
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It is concluded that this pattern of pelvic sex differences did not evolve de novo in modern humans and must have been present in the common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees, and thus also in the extinct Homo species.
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It is concluded that australopithecines required cooperative breeding to care for their secondary altricial infants, and these prerequisites for advanced cognitive development seem to have been corollary to skeletal adaptations for bipedal locomotion that preceded the appearance of the genus Homo and the increase in encephalization.
The association of parturition scars and pelvic shape: A geometric morphometric study
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Can the Dynamic External Pelvimetry Test in Late Pregnancy Reveal Obstructed and Prolonged Labor? Results From a Pilot Study
TLDR
Dimension and biomechanical properties of the pelvic tissue and spaces influence the evolutionary childbirth process and hypomobility of specified external pelvic diameters measured in shifting positions can become a screening tool to detect the contracted pelvis and prevent damage caused by dystocia and prolonged labor in women and newborns.
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