Evolution of the human diet: linking our ancestral diet to modern functional foods as a means of chronic disease prevention.

@article{Jew2009EvolutionOT,
  title={Evolution of the human diet: linking our ancestral diet to modern functional foods as a means of chronic disease prevention.},
  author={S. Jew and S. AbuMweis and P. Jones},
  journal={Journal of medicinal food},
  year={2009},
  volume={12 5},
  pages={
          925-34
        }
}
The evolution of the human diet over the past 10,000 years from a Paleolithic diet to our current modern pattern of intake has resulted in profound changes in feeding behavior. Shifts have occurred from diets high in fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and seafood to processed foods high in sodium and hydrogenated fats and low in fiber. These dietary changes have adversely affected dietary parameters known to be related to health, resulting in an increase in obesity and chronic disease, including… Expand
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