Evolution of the brain and intelligence

@article{Roth2005EvolutionOT,
  title={Evolution of the brain and intelligence},
  author={G. Roth and U. Dicke},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={9},
  pages={250-257}
}
  • G. Roth, U. Dicke
  • Published 2005
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences
Intelligence has evolved many times independently among vertebrates. Primates, elephants and cetaceans are assumed to be more intelligent than 'lower' mammals, the great apes and humans more than monkeys, and humans more than the great apes. Brain properties assumed to be relevant for intelligence are the (absolute or relative) size of the brain, cortex, prefrontal cortex and degree of encephalization. However, factors that correlate better with intelligence are the number of cortical neurons… Expand
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