Evolution of the Mammary Gland Defense System and the Ontogeny of the Immune System

@article{Goldman2004EvolutionOT,
  title={Evolution of the Mammary Gland Defense System and the Ontogeny of the Immune System},
  author={Armond S. Goldman},
  journal={Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia},
  year={2004},
  volume={7},
  pages={277-289}
}
  • A. Goldman
  • Published 1 July 2002
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia
A decisive event in the evolution of mammals from synapsid reptiles was the modification of ventral thoracic–abdominal epidermal glands to form the mammary gland. The natural selection events that drove the process may have been the provision of certain immunological agents in dermal secretions of those nascent mammals. This is mirrored by similar innate immune factors in mammalian sebum and in protherian and eutherian milks. On the basis of studies of existing mammalian orders, it is evident… Expand
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