Evolution of the Gene Network Underlying Wing Polyphenism in Ants

@article{Abouheif2002EvolutionOT,
  title={Evolution of the Gene Network Underlying Wing Polyphenism in Ants},
  author={Ehab Abouheif and Gregory A. Wray},
  journal={Science},
  year={2002},
  volume={297},
  pages={249 - 252}
}
Wing polyphenism in ants evolved once, 125 million years ago, and has been a key to their amazing evolutionary success. We characterized the expression of several genes within the network underlying the wing primordia of reproductive (winged) and sterile (wingless) ant castes. We show that the expression of several genes within the network is conserved in the winged castes of four ant species, whereas points of interruption within the network in the wingless castes are evolutionarily labile… Expand

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