Evolution of the Galapagos Finches

@article{Lack1940EvolutionOT,
  title={Evolution of the Galapagos Finches},
  author={David Lambert Lack},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1940},
  volume={146},
  pages={324-327}
}
  • D. Lack
  • Published 1 September 1940
  • Biology
  • Nature
INTRODUCTION THE land faunas of oceanic islands have always excited considerable evolutionary speculation, and, starting with the “Origin of Species”, the Geospizinæ, the endemic Galapagos finches, have probably featured in as many evolutionary discussions as any group of animals. They differ from almost all other land birds of oceanic islands in that there is more than one species on each island. Further, some of the species seem to grade into each other, and others are linked by freak… 
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Darwin's finches represent a dynamic radiation of birds within the Galapagos Archipelago. Unlike classic island radiations dominated by island endemics and intuitive ‘conveyer belt’ colonization with
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References

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Evolution in mendelian populations
Page 108, last line of text, for "P/P″" read "P′/P″." Page 120, last line, for "δ v " read "δ y ." Page 123, line 10, for "4Nn" read "4Nu." Page 125, line 1, for "q" read "q." Page 126, line 12,