Evolution of insect wings and development – new details from Palaeozoic nymphs

@article{Haug2016EvolutionOI,
  title={Evolution of insect wings and development – new details from Palaeozoic nymphs},
  author={Joachim T. Haug and Carolin Haug and Russell J. Garwood},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2016},
  volume={91}
}
The nymphal stages of Palaeozoic insects differ significantly in morphology from those of their modern counterparts. Morphological details for some previously reported species have recently been called into question. Palaeozoic insect nymphs are important, however – their study could provide key insights into the evolution of wings, and complete metamorphosis. Here we review past work on these topics and juvenile insects in the fossil record, and then present both novel and previously described… Expand
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