Evolution of digital organisms at high mutation rates leads to survival of the flattest

@article{Wilke2001EvolutionOD,
  title={Evolution of digital organisms at high mutation rates leads to survival of the flattest},
  author={Claus O. Wilke and Jia Lan Wang and C. Ofria and Richard E. Lenski and C. Adami},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2001},
  volume={412},
  pages={331-333}
}
  • Claus O. Wilke, Jia Lan Wang, +2 authors C. Adami
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature
  • Darwinian evolution favours genotypes with high replication rates, a process called ‘survival of the fittest’. However, knowing the replication rate of each individual genotype may not suffice to predict the eventual survivor, even in an asexual population. According to quasi-species theory, selection favours the cloud of genotypes, interconnected by mutation, whose average replication rate is highest. Here we confirm this prediction using digital organisms that self-replicate, mutate and… CONTINUE READING
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