Evolution of clutch size in insects. I. A review of static optimality models

@article{Wilson1994EvolutionOC,
  title={Evolution of clutch size in insects. I. A review of static optimality models},
  author={Kenneth Wilson and Catherine M. Lessells},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={1994},
  volume={7}
}
Abstract This paper reviews the importance of constraint assumptions to the predictions of static optimality models of insect clutch size. This allows us to identify predictions that distinguish between models embodying different constraints on female oviposition behaviour and hence to determine which resources or other factors limit clutch size evolutionarily. We conclude that while some models may be distinguished using qualitative criteria, others require the testing of quantitative… 

Evolution of clutch size in insects. II. A test of static optimality models using the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

The results suggest that the main constraints on bruchid oviposition behaviour are the amount of time available for laying eggs and the number of other females ovipositing, however, additional qualitative predictions indicate that theNumber of eggs available to the female may also constrain clutch size evolutionarily.

Virginity and the clutch size behavior of a parasitoid wasp where mothers mate their sons.

The data demonstrate that there is a trade-off between the size of the first and subsequent clutches and that virgin females adjust their production of sons according to the mating status (mated or not) of cofounding females.

Putting more eggs in the best basket: clutch‐size regulation in the comma butterfly

It is not clear whether ovipositing females are responding to host quality or quantity when it comes to clutch size, and different factors influencing clutch‐size regulation, primarily within various groups of insects.

Conflict between optimal clutch size for mothers and offspring in the leaf miner, Leucoptera sinuella

Abstract.  1. Clutch size in a leaf‐mining moth, Leucoptera sinuella (Reutti), was examined to determine whether the clutch size in natural populations meets the prediction of an optimal strategy,

Integrating theory of clutch size and body size evolution for parasitoids

The message is that consideration of both body size and clutch size variation simultaneously can enhance understanding or resource allocation strategies in this group of organisms, illustrating the value of an integrated life history approach.

Clutch size manipulations in two seed beetles: consequences for progeny fitness

This work tested the hypothesis that natural selection on larval life history characters favors small clutches (selection against large clutches) in S. limbatus, but that selection againstLarge clutches is relaxed inS.

The importance of being large: the relationship between size and fitness in females of the parasitoid Aphaereta minuta (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

The relationship between a number of constraints and female size was studied in the parasitoid Aphaereta minuta, and larger females were found to have more eggs available, have larger eggs, live longer and have a higher searching efficiency within patches than small females, but searching efficiency for patches and travel speed were finding to be independent of size.

The importance of being larger: parasitoid intruder–owner contests and their implications for clutch size

It is argued that because female fitness is determined, at least in part, by body size relative to competitors, an evolutionarily stable strategy approach is required to calculate optimal clutch size when host ownership contests occur and this provides a candidate explanation for the previously reported discrepancy.

Putting more eggs in the best basket: clutch-size regulation in the comma butterfly

P. c-album females exhibit clutch-size regulation, with larger clutches on better hosts, it is suggested that the proximate mechanism is likely to be a response to the same stimuli used for female ranking of host plants in the preference hierarchy.

The problem of optimal clutch size in a tritrophic system: the oviposition strategy of the thistle gallfly Urophora cardui (Diptera, Tephritidae)

The high variation of clutch sizes in U. cardui is interpreted as a mixed strategy of bet hedging and gambling, which might favour large clutches once an appropriate oviposition site has been located.

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Evolution of clutch size in insects. II. A test of static optimality models using the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

The results suggest that the main constraints on bruchid oviposition behaviour are the amount of time available for laying eggs and the number of other females ovipositing, however, additional qualitative predictions indicate that theNumber of eggs available to the female may also constrain clutch size evolutionarily.

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Reproductive output from enlarged or reduced magpie broods showed that each female generally lays a clutch of optimal size. This size varies considerably between females. Approximately 85 percent of

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    The American Naturalist
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A series of models for predicting optimal egg size and clutch size in different environments and for different maternal phenotypes are developed and it is shown that in seasonal environments the production of smaller clutches of larger eggs is favored by slower rates of preadult development and shorter overall season lengths.

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