Evolution of cave living in Hawaiian Schrankia (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) with description of a remarkable new cave species

@article{Medeiros2009EvolutionOC,
  title={Evolution of cave living in Hawaiian Schrankia (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) with description of a remarkable new cave species},
  author={Matthew J. Medeiros and Donald R. Davis and Francis G. Howarth and Rosemary G. Gillespie},
  journal={Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society},
  year={2009},
  volume={156},
  pages={114-139}
}
Although temperate cave-adapted fauna may evolve as a result of climatic change, tropical cave dwellers probably colonize caves through adaptive shifts to exploit new resources. The founding populations may have traits that make colonization of underground spaces even more likely. To investigate the process of cave adaptation and the number of times that flightlessness has evolved in a group of reportedly flightless Hawaiian cave moths, we tested the flight ability of 54 Schrankia individuals… Expand
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