Evolution of bite performance in turtles

@article{Herrel2002EvolutionOB,
  title={Evolution of bite performance in turtles},
  author={Anthony Herrel and James C. O’Reilly and Alan M. Richmond},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={15}
}
Abstract Among vertebrates, there is often a tight correlation between variation in cranial morphology and diet. Yet, the relationships between morphological characteristics and feeding performance are usually only inferred from biomechanical models. Here, we empirically test whether differences in body dimensions are correlated with bite performance and trophic ecology for a large number of turtle species. A comparative phylogenetic analysis indicates that turtles with carnivorous and… Expand
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Theoretical calculations of bite force in billfishes
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