Evolution of Virulence in a Plant Host-Pathogen Metapopulation

@article{Thrall2003EvolutionOV,
  title={Evolution of Virulence in a Plant Host-Pathogen Metapopulation},
  author={Peter H. Thrall and Jeremy J. Burdon},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={299},
  pages={1735 - 1737}
}
In a wild plant–pathogen system, host resistance and pathogen virulence varied markedly among local populations. Broadly virulent pathogens occurred more frequently in highly resistant host populations, whereas avirulent pathogens dominated susceptible populations. Experimental inoculations indicated a negative trade-off between spore production and virulence. The nonrandom spatial distribution of pathogens, maintained through time despite high pathogen mobility, implies that selection favors… 

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