Evolution of Pollination and Mutualism in the Yucca Moth Lineage

@article{Pellmyr1996EvolutionOP,
  title={Evolution of Pollination and Mutualism in the Yucca Moth Lineage},
  author={Olle Pellmyr and John N. Thompson and Jonathan M. Brown and Richard G. Harrison},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1996},
  volume={148},
  pages={827 - 847}
}
The obligate pollination mutualisms between yucca moths and yuccas are some of the most obvious cases of coevolution, but the phylogenetic origins and extent of coevolution in these interactions are little understood. Ecological and phylogenetic information from the yucca moth family, Prodoxidae, shows that pollination has evolved at least three times from separate moth behaviors. Passive pollination occurs in Greya during nectaring by one species and during oviposition by two other species… Expand
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