Evolution of Obligate Siblicide in Boobies. 1. A Test of the Insurance-Egg Hypothesis

@article{Anderson1990EvolutionOO,
  title={Evolution of Obligate Siblicide in Boobies. 1. A Test of the Insurance-Egg Hypothesis},
  author={David J. Anderson},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1990},
  volume={135},
  pages={334 - 350}
}
Obligate siblicide, the unconditional killing of an individual by its sibling, occurs in a small number of bird species. Although clutches of two eggs are frequently laid, obligate siblicide eliminates the younger hatchling before it reaches the age of independence. The phenomenon presents a challenge to adaptationist evolutionary theory because parents produce chicks that are virtually certain to be killed and because surviving offspring actively sacrifice the inclusive-fitness increment… 
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EVOLUTION OF OBLIGATE SIBLICIDE IN BOOBIES. 2: FOOD LIMITATION AND PARENT–OFFSPRING CONFLICT
  • D. J. Anderson
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1990
TLDR
Estimates of inclusive fitness of chicks in experimental broods were higher than were those of control nestlings, a result inconsistent with the POC hypothesis that the siblicidal offspring's optimal brood size is one while the parents' optimum is greater than one.
The Evolution of Clutch Size and Hatching Asynchrony in Altricial Birds: The Effect of Environmental Variability, Egg Failure and Predation
TLDR
The model predicts that laying surplus eggs may evolve when the daily risk of predation is high, provided that the extra eggs hatch asynchronously, and shows, when laying additional eggs to track environmental variability and/or insure against egg inviability is of selective advantage.
Siblicide, family conflict and the evolutionary limits of selfishness
TLDR
A précis is presented that aims to give a quick overview of the theory and empirical data addressing both sibling competition and parent-offspring conflict, and to update the book's literature review with a few late-breaking findings.
Costs and benefits of surplus offspring in the lesser kestrel (Falco naumanni )
  • J. Aparicio
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 1997
TLDR
Results supported only the insurance-egg hypothesis which says that surplus eggs may be an insurance against the failure of any egg, but parents may suffer reproductive costs when all eggs hatch.
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EVOLUTION OF OBLIGATE SIBLICIDE IN BOOBIES. 2: FOOD LIMITATION AND PARENT–OFFSPRING CONFLICT
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