Evolution of Key Cell Signaling and Adhesion Protein Families Predates Animal Origins

@article{King2003EvolutionOK,
  title={Evolution of Key Cell Signaling and Adhesion Protein Families Predates Animal Origins},
  author={Nicole King and Chris Todd Hittinger and Sean B Carroll},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={301},
  pages={361 - 363}
}
The evolution of animals from a unicellular ancestor involved many innovations. Choanoflagellates, unicellular and colonial protozoa closely related to Metazoa, provide a potential window into early animal evolution. We have found that choanoflagellates express representatives of a surprising number of cell signaling and adhesion protein families that have not previously been isolated from nonmetazoans, including cadherins, C-type lectins, several tyrosine kinases, and tyrosine kinase signaling… Expand

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