Evolution of Fish-Shaped Reptiles (reptilia: Ichthyopterygia) in Their Physical Environments and Constraints

@article{Motani2005EvolutionOF,
  title={Evolution of Fish-Shaped Reptiles (reptilia: Ichthyopterygia) in Their Physical Environments and Constraints},
  author={R. Motani},
  journal={Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={33},
  pages={395-420}
}
  • R. Motani
  • Published 2005
  • Biology
  • Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences
  • ▪ Abstract Ichthyosaurs were a group of Mesozoic marine reptiles that evolved fish-shaped body outlines. They are unique in several anatomical characters, including the possession of enormous eyeballs sometimes exceeding 25 cm and an enlarged manus with sometimes up to 20 bones in a single digit, or 10 digits per manus. They are also unique in that their biology has been studied from the perspective of physical constraints, which allowed estimation of such characteristics as optimal cruising… CONTINUE READING

    Figures from this paper.

    Convergent Evolution in Aquatic Tetrapods: Insights from an Exceptional Fossil Mosasaur
    • 69
    • PDF
    Mesozoic marine reptile palaeobiogeography in response to drifting plates
    • 71
    • PDF
    A bizarre new toothed mysticete (Cetacea) from Australia and the early evolution of baleen whales
    • 116
    • PDF

    References

    Publications referenced by this paper.
    SHOWING 1-10 OF 63 REFERENCES
    Eel-like swimming in the earliest ichthyosaurs
    • 70
    • Highly Influential
    Ichthyosaurian relationships illuminated by new primitive skeletons from Japan
    • 63
    First record of live birth in Cretaceous ichthyosaurs: closing an 80 million year gap
    • 32
    • PDF
    Why did some ichthyosaurs have such large eyes?
    • 26
    • PDF
    Scaling effects in caudal fin propulsion and the speed of ichthyosaurs
    • 57
    • PDF
    Unusual gut contents in a Cretaceous ichthyosaur
    • 47
    Swimming capabilities of Mesozoic marine reptiles: implications for method of predation
    • 160
    • Highly Influential
    SWIMMING STYLES IN JURASSIC ICHTHYOSAURS
    • 62