Evolution of CAM and C4 Carbon‐Concentrating Mechanisms

@article{Keeley2003EvolutionOC,
  title={Evolution of CAM and C4 Carbon‐Concentrating Mechanisms},
  author={Jon E. Keeley and Philip W. Rundel},
  journal={International Journal of Plant Sciences},
  year={2003},
  volume={164},
  pages={S55 - S77}
}
  • J. Keeley, P. Rundel
  • Published 1 May 2003
  • Environmental Science
  • International Journal of Plant Sciences
Mechanisms for concentrating carbon around the Rubisco enzyme, which drives the carbon‐reducing steps in photosynthesis, are widespread in plants; in vascular plants they are known as crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and C4 photosynthesis. CAM is common in desert succulents, tropical epiphytes, and aquatic plants and is characterized by nighttime fixation of CO2. The proximal selective factor driving the evolution of this CO2‐concentrating pathway is low daytime CO2, which results from the… 
The evolution of inorganic carbon concentrating mechanisms in photosynthesis
TLDR
The earliest CCMs may have evolved in oxygenic cyanobacteria before the atmosphere became oxygenated in stromatolites with diffusion barriers around the cells related to UV screening, and increase the O2 concentration within them, inhibiting rubisco and generating reactive oxygen species, including O3.
Crassulacean acid metabolism in the context of other carbon-concentrating mechanisms in freshwater plants: a review
TLDR
In aquatic plants, CAM appears to be an ecologically important mechanism for increasing inorganic carbon uptake, because the in situ contribution from CAM to the C-budget generally is high (18–55%).
The evolution of C4 photosynthesis.
  • R. Sage
  • Environmental Science
    The New phytologist
  • 2004
TLDR
Gene duplication followed by neo- and nonfunctionalization are the leading mechanisms for creating C4 genomes, with selection for carbon conservation traits under conditions promoting high photorespiration being the ultimate factor behind the origin of C4 photosynthesis.
Low atmospheric CO2 induces nocturnal carbon accumulation in the lycophyte genus Isoëtes
TLDR
Empirical support is provided for a long-standing assumption that nocturnal carbon accumulation in the lycophyte lineage is an adaptation to low daytime carbon levels in aquatic ecosystems and an earlier evolution of this behavior is suggested, leading to the notion that CAM in xerophytes may only represent a subset of metabolisms that employNocturnalcarbon accumulation in response to variable environmental pressures.
The Physiological Ecology of C3-C4 Intermediate Eudicots in Warm Environments
  • P. Vogan
  • Environmental Science, Biology
  • 2011
TLDR
The purpose of this thesis is to ascertain the specific benefits to plant carbon balance through suppression of O2 inhibition through concentration of CO2 around Rubisco.
EVOLUTIONARY ASPECTS OF CRASSULACEAN ACID METABOLISM
TLDR
CAM is widely distributed among botanical families, its origin is believed to be polyphyletic; however, the evolutionary mechanisms which allowed reappearance of this complex metabolism are not yet understood.
Single-cell C(4) photosynthesis versus the dual-cell (Kranz) paradigm.
TLDR
The amazing diversity in C( 4) systems is discussed, how the essential features of C(4) are accomplished in single-cell versus Kranz-type C(2) plants, and speculates on why single- cell C(3) plants evolved.
The evolution of C 4 photosynthesis
TLDR
Gene duplication followed by neoand nonfunctionalization are the leading mechanisms for creating C 4 genomes, with selection for carbon conservation traits under conditions promoting high photorespiration being the ultimate factor behind the origin of C 4 photosynthesis.
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References

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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Gene duplication followed by neoand nonfunctionalization are the leading mechanisms for creating C 4 genomes, with selection for carbon conservation traits under conditions promoting high photorespiration being the ultimate factor behind the origin of C 4 photosynthesis.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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