Evolution of Brain Size in the Palaeognath Lineage, with an Emphasis on New Zealand Ratites

@article{Corfield2007EvolutionOB,
  title={Evolution of Brain Size in the Palaeognath Lineage, with an Emphasis on New Zealand Ratites},
  author={Jeremy R. Corfield and J. Martin Wild and Mark. E. Hauber and Stuart Parsons and M. Fabiana Kubke},
  journal={Brain, Behavior and Evolution},
  year={2007},
  volume={71},
  pages={87 - 99}
}
Brain size in vertebrates varies principally with body size. Although many studies have examined the variation of brain size in birds, there is little information on Palaeognaths, which include the ratite lineage of kiwi, emu, ostrich and extinct moa, as well as the tinamous. Therefore, we set out to determine to what extent the evolution of brain size in Palaeognaths parallels that of other birds, i.e., Neognaths, by analyzing the variation in the relative sizes of the brain and cerebral… 

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