Evolution in the House Sparrow. III. Variation in Size and Sexual Dimorphism in Europe and North and South America

@article{Johnston1973EvolutionIT,
  title={Evolution in the House Sparrow. III. Variation in Size and Sexual Dimorphism in Europe and North and South America},
  author={Richard F. Johnston and Robert K. Selander},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1973},
  volume={107},
  pages={373 - 390}
}
Geographic variation in size of skin variables in house sparrows Passer domesticus parallels the known variation in skeletal variables; size varies from small to large with latitude in North America but from large to small with latitude in Europe; there is no clinal pattern in our South American samples. Secondary sexual size dimorphism is wholly characteristic of house sparrows of all three continents. For North American and European samples there is smoothly clinal variation in the degree to… 

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