Evolution in bacteria: Evidence for a universal substitution rate in cellular genomes

@article{Ochman2005EvolutionIB,
  title={Evolution in bacteria: Evidence for a universal substitution rate in cellular genomes},
  author={Howard Ochman and Allan Charles Wilson},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={26},
  pages={74-86}
}
SummaryThis paper constructs a temporal scale for bacterial evolution by tying ecological events that took place at known times in the geological past to specific branch points in the genealogical tree relating the 16S ribosomal RNAs of eubacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. One thus obtains a relationship between time and bacterial RNA divergence which can be used to estimate times of divergence between other branches in the bacterial tree. According to this approach,Salmonella… Expand

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