Evolution and phylogeny of Wolbachia: reproductive parasites of arthropods

@article{Werren1995EvolutionAP,
  title={Evolution and phylogeny of Wolbachia: reproductive parasites of arthropods},
  author={John H. Werren and Wan Zhang and Li Rong Guo},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1995},
  volume={261},
  pages={55 - 63}
}
  • J. Werren, Wan Zhang, L. Guo
  • Published 22 July 1995
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
Wolbachia are cytoplasmically inherited bacteria found in reproductive tissues of many arthropod species. [] Key Method A fine-scale phylogenetic analysis was done using DNA sequences from ftsZ, a rapidly evolving bacterial cell-cycle gene. ftsZ sequences were determined for 38 different Wolbachiastrains from 31 different species of insects and one isopod. The following results were found: (i) there are two major division of Wolbachia (A and B) which diverged 58-67 millions years before present based upon…

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