Evolution and Social Cognition: Contrast Effects as a Function of Sex, Dominance, and Physical Attractiveness

@article{Kenrick1994EvolutionAS,
  title={Evolution and Social Cognition: Contrast Effects as a Function of Sex, Dominance, and Physical Attractiveness},
  author={D. Kenrick and S. L. Neuberg and K. Zierk and Jacquelyn M. Krones},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={1994},
  volume={20},
  pages={210 - 217}
}
  • D. Kenrick, S. L. Neuberg, +1 author Jacquelyn M. Krones
  • Published 1994
  • Psychology
  • Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
  • Previous research indicates that males, compared with females, evaluate their relationships less favorably after exposure to physically attractive members of the other sex. An evolutionary model predicts a converse effect after exposure to opposite-sex individuals high in dominance, which should lead females to evaluate their current relationships less favorably than males. Women and men rated their current relationships after being exposed to opposite-sex targets varying in both dominance and… CONTINUE READING
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