Evidence that alterations in presynaptic inhibition contribute to segmental hypo- and hyperexcitability after spinal cord injury in man.

@article{Calancie1993EvidenceTA,
  title={Evidence that alterations in presynaptic inhibition contribute to segmental hypo- and hyperexcitability after spinal cord injury in man.},
  author={Blair Calancie and James G Broton and K John Klose and M Traad and J Difini and Dr. Ayyar},
  journal={Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology},
  year={1993},
  volume={89 3},
  pages={177-86}
}
We examined Hoffmann (H) and tendon (T) reflexes in 3 populations of adult subjects: acute SCI (< 2 weeks post injury), controls, and chronic SCI (> 1 year post injury). We further investigated the effects of continuous tendon vibration and different stimulus rates on the size of evoked H reflexes in these subject populations. All reflex amplitudes were expressed as a function of the maximum direct muscle response (M wave), to allow comparison between subjects. Both H and T reflexes were… CONTINUE READING

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 75 extracted citations

Effects of vibration on spasticity in individuals with spinal cord injury: a scoping systematic review.

American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation • 2014
View 10 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Impaired efficacy of spinal presynaptic mechanisms in spastic stroke patients.

Brain : a journal of neurology • 2009
View 5 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Focal Vibration Stretches Muscle Fibers by Producing Muscle Waves

IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering • 2018
View 2 Excerpts

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…