Evidence that aging and amyloid promote microglial cell senescence.

@article{Flanary2007EvidenceTA,
  title={Evidence that aging and amyloid promote microglial cell senescence.},
  author={Barry E. Flanary and Nicole W Sammons and Cuong Nguyen and Douglas Gordon Walker and Wolfgang J Streit},
  journal={Rejuvenation research},
  year={2007},
  volume={10 1},
  pages={
          61-74
        }
}
Advanced age and presence of intracerebral amyloid deposits are known to be major risk factors for development of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and both have been associated with microglial activation. However, the specific role of activated microglia in AD pathogenesis remains unresolved. Here we report that microglial cells exhibit significant telomere shortening and reduction of telomerase activity with normal aging in rats, and that in humans there is a tendency toward… 

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