Evidence of reverse development in Leptomedusae (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa): the case of Laodicea undulata (Forbes and Goodsir 1851)

@article{Vito2006EvidenceOR,
  title={Evidence of reverse development in Leptomedusae (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa): the case of Laodicea undulata (Forbes and Goodsir 1851)},
  author={Doris De Vito and Stefano Piraino and J{\"u}rgen Schmich and Jean Paul Bouillon and Ferdinando Boero},
  journal={Marine Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={149},
  pages={339-346}
}
Laboratory rearing and reconstruction of Laodicea undulata (Hydrozoa) life cycle led to the discovery for the first time in Leptomedusae of the potential for ontogeny reversal, i.e. the medusa stage can asexually transform back into the polyp stage. In turn, each rejuvenated polyp stage can newly activate the standard developmental programme towards colony morphogenesis and budding of secondary medusae. These can be considered as clonemates of the initial medusa batch, since they originate by… 

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