Evidence of human occupation in Mexico around the Last Glacial Maximum

@article{Ardelean2020EvidenceOH,
  title={Evidence of human occupation in Mexico around the Last Glacial Maximum},
  author={Ciprian F. Ardelean and Lorena Becerra-Valdivia and Mikkel Winther Pedersen and J. L. Schwenninger and Charles G. Oviatt and Juan Ignacio Mac{\'i}as-Quintero and Joaqu{\'i}n Arroyo-Cabrales and Martin Sikora and Yam Zul Ernesto Ocampo-D{\'i}az and Igor Ishi Rubio-Cisneros and Jennifer Watling and Vanda Brito de Medeiros and Paulo E. De Oliveira and Luis Barba-Pingar{\'o}n and Agust{\'i}n Ort{\'i}z-Butr{\'o}n and Jorge Blancas-V{\'a}zquez and Ir{\'a}n Rivera-Gonz{\'a}lez and Corina Sol{\'i}s-Rosales and Mar{\'i}a Rodr{\'i}guez-Ceja and Devlin A. Gandy and Zamara Navarro-Guti{\'e}rrez and Jes{\'u}s J. De La Rosa-D{\'i}az and Vladimir Huerta-Arellano and Marco B. Marroqu{\'i}n-Fern{\'a}ndez and L. Martin Mart{\'i}nez-Riojas and A. L{\'o}pez-Jim{\'e}nez and Thomas F.G. Higham and Eske Willerslev},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2020},
  pages={1-6}
}
The initial colonization of the Americas remains a highly debated topic 1 , and the exact timing of the first arrivals is unknown. The earliest archaeological record of Mexico—which holds a key geographical position in the Americas—is poorly known and understudied. Historically, the region has remained on the periphery of research focused on the first American populations 2 . However, recent investigations provide reliable evidence of a human presence in the northwest region of Mexico 3 , 4… Expand
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