Evidence of Dolphin Self-Recognition and the Difficulties of Interpretation

@article{Mitchell1995EvidenceOD,
  title={Evidence of Dolphin Self-Recognition and the Difficulties of Interpretation},
  author={Robert W. Mitchell},
  journal={Consciousness and Cognition},
  year={1995},
  volume={4},
  pages={229-234}
}
  • R. Mitchell
  • Published 1 June 1995
  • Psychology
  • Consciousness and Cognition

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