Evidence of Burning from Bushfires in Southern and East Africa and Its Relevance to Hominin Evolution

@article{Gowlett2017EvidenceOB,
  title={Evidence of Burning from Bushfires in Southern and East Africa and Its Relevance to Hominin Evolution},
  author={John A J Gowlett and James S. Brink and A. B. Caris and Sally Hoare and Stephen M. Rucina},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2017},
  volume={58},
  pages={S206 - S216}
}
Early human fire use is of great scientific interest, but little comparative work has been undertaken across the ecological settings in which natural fire occurs or on the taphonomy of fire and circumstances in which natural and human-controlled fire could be confused. We present here results of experiments carried out with fire fronts from grass- and bushland in South and East Africa. Our work illustrates that in these circumstances hominins would have been able to walk with and exploit fires… 

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