Evidence of Burning from Bushfires in Southern and East Africa and Its Relevance to Hominin Evolution

@article{Gowlett2017EvidenceOB,
  title={Evidence of Burning from Bushfires in Southern and East Africa and Its Relevance to Hominin Evolution},
  author={J. Gowlett and J. Brink and A. Caris and S. Hoare and S. Rucina},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2017},
  volume={58},
  pages={S206 - S216}
}
Early human fire use is of great scientific interest, but little comparative work has been undertaken across the ecological settings in which natural fire occurs or on the taphonomy of fire and circumstances in which natural and human-controlled fire could be confused. We present here results of experiments carried out with fire fronts from grass- and bushland in South and East Africa. Our work illustrates that in these circumstances hominins would have been able to walk with and exploit fires… Expand
Fire in the round: A holistic approach to the Lower Palaeolithic record
Abstract Whilst several explanations have been proposed for the absence of fire-related behaviours at well preserved Lower Palaeolithic sites, much of the emphasis of previous research hasExpand
Fire and the Genus Homo
Employing fire as an adaptive aid represents one of the most important technological developments in the course of hominin evolution, and, not surprisingly, research into the prehistoric use of fireExpand
Identifying and Describing Pattern and Process in the Evolution of Hominin Use of Fire
Although research relating to Paleolithic fire use has a long history, it has seen a particular resurgence in the last decade. This has been fueled in part by improved analytical techniques, improvedExpand
Taphonomy of burnt bones from Wonderwerk Cave (South Africa)
Abstract The understanding of hominin behavior is based on complex factors, frequently obtained from evidence left on the fossils themselves or on accompanying fauna. Fossil bones bearing traits ofExpand
Experimental Approaches to Archaeological Fire Features and Their Behavioral Relevance
TLDR
This review highlights not only what one can find in ideal preservation conditions but also what type of indirect alteration proxies can be expected to survive in the archaeological record. Expand
Early evidence of fire in south-western Europe: the Acheulean site of Gruta da Aroeira (Torres Novas, Portugal)
TLDR
A multi-analytic study of the by-products of burning recorded in layer X suggests the presence of anthropogenic fires at the site, among the oldest such evidence in south-western Europe. Expand
Middle Pleistocene fire use: The first signal of widespread cultural diffusion in human evolution
TLDR
This work interprets the archaeological signal of fire use from around 400,000 y ago as representing the earliest clear-cut case of widespread cultural change resulting from diffusion in human evolution, and suggests a form of cultural behavior significantly more similar to that of extant Homo sapiens than to the authors' great ape relatives. Expand
Fire for a Reason
Qesem Cave is a Middle Pleistocene site in Israel occupied between 420 and 200 ka. Excavations have revealed a wealth of innovative behaviors most likely practiced by a new hominin lineage. TheseExpand
The Moyjil site, south-west Victoria, Australia: excavation of a Last Interglacial charcoal and and burnt stone feature — is it a hearth?
Claims for a human presence in Australia beyond 60,000 years ago must have a strong evidence base associated with rigorous methodology and intense scrutiny. In this light we present excavationExpand
Experimenting the Use of Fire in the Operational Chain of Prehistoric Wooden Tools: the Digging Sticks of Poggetti Vecchi (Italy)
As known, artefacts made from wood are very rarely encountered in prehistoric deposits due to the low durability of this material. Emergency excavations in the spring of 2012 at Poggetti Vecchi,Expand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 59 REFERENCES
How Did Hominins Adapt to Ice Age Europe without Fire?
Analyses of archaeological material recovered from several Middle Paleolithic sites in southwest France have provided strong corroborating data on Neanderthal use of fire. Both direct and indirectExpand
Evolution of human-driven fire regimes in Africa
TLDR
This model explores how changes in population density, the ability to create fire, and the expansion of agropastoralism altered the extent and seasonal distribution of fire as modern humans arose and spread through Africa and suggests the biomass burned today is less than in the recent past in subtropical countries. Expand
Spatial Analysis of Fire
The use of fire by early hominins is considered a significant technological and cultural revolution. Recently, the study of fire use has been affected by a troublesome trend that views chemical andExpand
Identifying and Describing Pattern and Process in the Evolution of Hominin Use of Fire
Although research relating to Paleolithic fire use has a long history, it has seen a particular resurgence in the last decade. This has been fueled in part by improved analytical techniques, improvedExpand
Aboriginal Use of Fire in a Landscape Context
A case study from western New South Wales, Australia, illustrates the age, preservation, and distribution of late Holocene heat-retainer hearths that are abundant in the semiarid archaeologicalExpand
The Pre-Quaternary history of fire
Abstract Although evidence for land vegetation comes from the Silurian, and maybe even earlier, the first record of fossil charcoal (fusain) is from the late Devonian. For this period there are onlyExpand
Humans in the Hoxnian: habitat, context and fire use at Beeches Pit, West Stow, Suffolk, UK†
A Lower Palaeolithic industry at Beeches Pit, West Stow, Suffolk, occurs within an interglacial sequence that immediately overlies glacial deposits, referable to the Anglian Lowestoft Formation.Expand
Experimental Approaches to Archaeological Fire Features and Their Behavioral Relevance
TLDR
This review highlights not only what one can find in ideal preservation conditions but also what type of indirect alteration proxies can be expected to survive in the archaeological record. Expand
Evidence from the Swartkrans cave for the earliest use of fire
During recent excavations of hominid-bearing breccias in the Swartkrans cave altered bones were recovered from Member 3 (about 1.0–1.5 Myr BP) which seemed to have been burnt. We examined theExpand
The human dimension of fire regimes on Earth
TLDR
An historical framework is provided to promote understanding of the development and diversification of fire regimes, covering the pre-human period, human domestication of fire, and the subsequent transition from subsistence agriculture to industrial economies. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...