Evidence from engineering that decarboxylation of free serine is the major source of ethanolamine moieties in plants.

@article{Rontein2003EvidenceFE,
  title={Evidence from engineering that decarboxylation of free serine is the major source of ethanolamine moieties in plants.},
  author={Denis Rontein and David Rhodes and Andrew D. Hanson},
  journal={Plant & cell physiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={44 11},
  pages={1185-91}
}
Plants form ethanolamine (Etn) moieties by decarboxylating serine or phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), and use them to make phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, choline, and glycine betaine. Serine decarboxylation is mediated by a serine decarboxylase (SDC) that is unique to plants and has a characteristic N-terminal extension. This extension was shown to have little influence on function of the enzyme in vitro. To explore the importance of SDC and its extension in vivo, native or… CONTINUE READING