Evidence from Claw Geometry Indicating Arboreal Habits of Archaeopteryx

@article{Feduccia1993EvidenceFC,
  title={Evidence from Claw Geometry Indicating Arboreal Habits of Archaeopteryx},
  author={Alan Feduccia},
  journal={Science},
  year={1993},
  volume={259},
  pages={790 - 793}
}
The Late Jurassic Archaeopteryx has been thought to have been a feathered predator adapted to running that represented a terrestrial stage in the evolution of true birds from coelurosaurian dinosaurs. Examination of claw geometry, however, shows that (i) modern ground- and tree-dwelling birds can be distinguished on the basis of claw curvature, in that greater claw arcs characterize tree-dwellers and trunk-climbers, and (ii) the claws of the pes (hind foot) and manus (front hand) of… Expand

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