Evidence for variability of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals over the past quarter century

@article{Prinn2005EvidenceFV,
  title={Evidence for variability of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals over the past quarter century},
  author={Ronald G. Prinn and J. Huang and Ray F. Weiss and Derek Martin Cunnold and P. J. Fraser and P. G. Simmonds and A. McCulloch and Christina M. Harth and S. Reimann and Peter K. Salameh and Simon J. O'Doherty and R. H. Wang and L. W. Porter and Benjamin R. Miller and Paul B. Krummel},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2005},
  volume={32}
}
The hydroxyl free radical (OH) is the major oxidizing chemical in the atmosphere, destroying about 3.7 petagrams (Pg) of trace gases each year, including many gases involved in ozone depletion, the greenhouse effect and urban air pollution. Measurements of 1,1,1‐trichloroethane (methyl chloroform, CH3CCl3), which reacts with OH, provide the most accurate method currently utilized for determining the global behavior of OH. We report that CH3CCl3 levels rose steadily from 1978 to reach a maximum… 

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